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The Balloon Animals are Jeff Koons's most iconic works from his Herculean Celebration series, which started in 1993. An ambitious body of works, consisting of over 30 monumental sculptures (made out of heavy stainless steel) and paintings that pay tribute to life’s big milestones, such as birthdays, weddings, and becoming a parent. The venture took over a decade to complete and nearly bankrupted Koons, requiring sizable investments from the artist’s collectors, dealers, and friends.

In partnership with the French porcelain manufacturer Bernardaud, the Balloon Animals limited edition, created out of French, Limoges porcelain, Jeff Koons democratizes the medium of porcelain, which was once the material of kings, and offers it to a new audience.

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Each limited edition consists of three balloon-shaped animals; the Balloon Rabbit, Balloon Monkey, and Balloon Swan, offered in two different colours. Starting with the first set in 2017, which had the Balloon Rabbit in red, the Balloon Monkey in blue, and the Balloon Swan in yellow colour.


Balloon Animals, Set I, 2017
French Limoges porcelain with chromatic coating
Edition of 999, matching edition number
Rabbit (Red)
: 29,2 x 13,9 x 21 cm (11.5 x 5.4 x 8.2 in.)
Monkey (Blue)
: 24,9 x 20,9 x 39,2 cm (9.8 x 8.2 x 15.4 in.)
Swan (Yellow)
: 24,1 x 16,4 x 21 cm (9.4 x 6.4 x 8.2 in.)
Signed and numbered on the underside
In mint condition

Explore the edition here

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The second set launch was unveiled in 2019, with the Balloon Rabbit in violet, the Balloon Monkey in Orange, and the Balloon Swan in magenta colour.

Balloon Animals, Set II, 2019
French Limoges porcelain with chromatic coating
Edition of 999, in matching edition number
Rabbit (Violet)
: 29,2 x 13,9 x 21 cm (11.5 x 5.4 x 8.2 in.)
Monkey (Orange)
: 24,9 x 20,9 x 39,2 cm (9.8 x 8.2 x 15.4 in.)
Swan (Magenta)
: 24,1 x 16,4 x 21 cm (9.4 x 6.4 x 8.2 in.)
Signed and numbered
In mint condition

Explore the edition here

These Balloon Animals are in limited edition (out of 999), therefore, there are only a few available for purchase. Once these are sold, there are no more being produced.


Our 5 simple tips for you to keep in mind:

1) Only 3 animals have been created: Balloon Rabbit, Balloon Monkey, Balloon Swan

2) There are only 2 colours for each animal
The Balloon Rabbit is available in red and violet, the Balloon Monkey is available in blue and orange, and the Balloon Swan in yellow and magenta

3) All editions are signed and numbered (out of an edition of 999) by Jeff Koons on the underside of each animal

4) Height is below 30 cm (12 inches)

5) There are only two Sets: the Balloon Rabbit (Red), with Balloon Monkey (Blue), and Balloon Swan (Yellow) all created in 2017. The Set II consists of Balloon Rabbit (Violet), Balloon Monkey (Orange), and Balloon Swan (Magenta) created in 2019.

Anything else, please dismiss. It is not an authentic edition by Jeff Koons.
Coming NEXT
: the Balloon Dogs are presented only with the plate - free standing dogs are unauthorized.

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Have any questions?
Get in touch via the LiveAssistance chat, send us an email (info@wengcontemporary.com), or WhatApp/WeChat (+41 76 541 56 58).

To explore each Balloon Animal, please click on this link here

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Loyalty (The Virtues, H9-7), 2021
Diasec-mounted Giclée print on aluminium composite panel
Edition of 1067
120 x 96 cm (47.2 x 37.8 in)

Hand-signed and numbered on label (verso)
In mint condition

Find out more here

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Mercy (The Virtues, H9-3), 2021
Diasec-mounted Giclée print on aluminium composite panel
Edition of 817
120 x 96 cm (47.2 x 37.8 in)

Hand-signed and numbered on label (verso)
In mint condition

Find out more here

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The Virtues (portfolio of 8), 2021
Diasec-mounted Giclée print on aluminium composite panel
Clockwise: Justice, Courage, Mercy, Politeness, Honesty, Honour, Loyalty, Control
In matching edition numbers
Each: 120 x 96 cm (47.2 x 37.8 in)
In mint condition

Find out more here

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In Paper Kite Butterfly on Oleander, Hirst features his signature motif – the butterfly – alive in its natural surroundings, hanging from a beautiful, strikingly coloured blossom. In this, he has created an uplifting and celestial image that inspires childlike wonder in the face of such a beauty of nature. At the same time, however, it provokes fundamental questions about the meaning of life, a life which is characterized by death, and the fragility of biological existence.

“I love butterflies because when they are dead they look alive."—Damien Hirst

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The distinction between life and death, myth and medicine, is explored by the Cabinet series, as they serve as a shrine to modern pharmaceuticals.

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There is no imminent promise of salvation, no escape offered in these works. Those black pills, as in Dark Black Heaven, are as threatening as they are strangely attractive, a dark fatal allure which we already know leads to one ultimate destiny.

Hirst’s work questions the equivocal role of medicine. It can either take life and save life or destroy and restore. These pills are not a memento mori like the skulls or the butterflies. They are a symbol of resignation and alienation from life, and a fatal attraction towards death.

"It’s like God should be, the way they sell you the pills, the forms, the utopia, the hope, the cure. We’ve come a long way since quack doctors."—Damien Hirst

The pharmaceutical cabinets, as in Hirst’s work Utopia, question people´s complete reliance on medications and their power to heal, which fulfill the natural desire for immortality. However, the question is: Can drugs cure this problem, or can art?

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On the other hand, Gold tears, which is part of the Utopia series, depicts rows of shiny diamonds on shelves covered with golden foil in front of a golden-beige background. The image is an intense vision of a golden cabinet filled with diamonds, a vision often associated with glorious eternity. But as always in Hirst’s art, the ambiguity is obvious – this cabinet points to the fact that behind all the shiny glittery surfaces there might be nothing, no meaning, and no soul. And hence the desire for eternity is less a promise than a condemnation.

"I can’t understand why most people believe in medicine and don’t believe in art, without questioning either."—Damien Hirst

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