Yue Minjun

Garbage Hill

Yue Minjun

Garbage Hill

Price: $4,000.00

Price excludes VAT
Framing not included

Details

Technique:
Lithograph
Year:
2009
Edition Size:
130
Dimensions:
80.0 x 120.0 cm (31.4 x 47.2 in)
Signature:
Signed and numbered

Artwork Condition

Poor Fair Very Good Excellent Mint
This item was reviewed by our specialist team to determine its condition.

About the Artwork

"Garbage Hills" belongs to the "Snatched Ecstasy" collection, a set of 20 lithographs in a brushed aluminum case and produced in a limited edition of 132 rare books. The collection is accompanied by a set of poems by the renowned Poet Fernando Arrabal.

"Here we are piled in a big heap of garbage making an abject hill and yet we are happy and we are laughing"

Fernando Arrabal

Yue Minjun’s works are instantly recognizable by the characteristic laughing figure, actually the artist himself, depicted in various guises in virtually all his works. The figure has more teeth than one could possibly want, like the expensive smiles of fashion models advertising the latest whitening power of a toothpaste brand. This figure also shares the exaggerated nature of these advertising images. Yue Minjun’s trademark smile is many things at once. It is hilarious and infectious yet cynical and mocking. It appears superficial, mindless, even ridiculous but is deeply revealing and compelling. There are instant parallels to be drawn with the Social Realist propaganda posters of earlier eras of communism.

About the Artist

Minjun2

Yue Min-Jun (born 1962, Daqing, China) is one of the leading Chinese artists. He is best known for oil paintings depicting formations of his laughing self-portraits in various settings. His iconography is easily recognisable, it challenges social and cultural conventions by depicting objects and political issues in a radical, abstract, ironic and cynical manner.

About the printing Technique

Weng Contemporary Lithography

Lithography literally means “stone drawing". This type of print is typically made by drawing or painting onto the surface of a limestone using a greasy crayon or liquid wash and is best known for its flat painterly surface.