Tapestry

Tapestry is the term that describes a range of textiles, including needlepoint and certain mechanically woven, ribbed fabrics, but historically and technically it designates a figurative weft-faced textile woven by hand on a loom.

The success of decorative tapestry in history can be explained in part by its portability. Kings and noblemen could roll up and transport tapestries from one residence to another. In churches, they were displayed for special occasions. Tapestries were also draped on the walls of castles for insulation during winter, as well as for decorative display.

Le Corbusier once called tapestries "nomadic murals".

In the 1930s, Jean Lurçat, a French surrealist painter, developed a system that simplified the complicated process of weaving and sparked a modern revival of the tapestry art form. Thanks to Lurçat’s vision, a surprising number of modern and contemporary painters and sculptors, like Pablo Picasso, Alexander Calder, Jean Arp, Fernand Léger, Le Corbusier, Henri Matisse, Vassily Kandinsky, Victor Vasarely, Robert Indiana and Andy Warhol, were inspired to transfer a selection of their enduring masterpieces to tapestry.

Today the word tapestry describes a range of textiles, including needlepoint and certain mechanically woven, ribbed fabrics, but historically and technically it designates a figurative weft-faced textile woven by hand on a loom.

Weng Contemporary Tapestry